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annie

What does engine cc (cubic capacity) actually means?

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I know that more teh cc the powerful the car gets but in really a technical language what does cc really mean? If car is 2.5 liter engine, then does that mean it can sip 2.5 liters per km or 2.5 liter goes in one shot, then how come 60-80 liter tank deliver over 400 km drive time. What does this cubc capacity really refers to?

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It's the volume of displacement between piston tdc and bdc multiplied by the number of engine cylinders. 

An easier way to explain it would be imagine the amount of water you could pour into a cylinder when the piston is at the bottom. 

The bigger the ccs, the more fuel/air mix you have available to ignite. Bigger bang means more power. If the total displacement is 2.5 liters, it will be more powerful than a 2.0 (in theory, as long as the fuel/air ratio is the same), it doesn't mean you will burn 2.5 liters of fuel in one stroke. Most of the 2.5 liters will be air. 

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The Engine Capacity is the combined capacity for all cylinders of the engine added together while it completes its one complete cycle. For example, if a four cylinder engine has capacity of 1000cc or 1.0L; that means all the four cylinders can together accommodate a maximum of 1000 cubic centimeters or 1.0L of volume of air in them. If the engine has only one cylinder, then that lone cylinder will accommodate all of the 1000cc or 1.0L of air inside it.

The ‘Engine Capacity’ is the volume, in other words; the space available inside the cylinder to accommodate air-fuel mixture for burning. As the volume of the air grows, the corresponding quantity of fuel supplied to the engine is also proportionately increased. As the amount of the fuel for burning increases, it  results in higher poweroutput. Hence, in simple words, the power output of an engine is directly proportional to the engine capacity in a conventional engine design.

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