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What about the Jeep wrangler for go anywhere needs or pickup trucks?

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32 minutes ago, Gaurav said:

I agree with you @desertdude on 100 series better for overland trips, BUT I strongly disagree to buy 100 series - FULL SIZE BOAT - GOOD FOR NOTHING IN DESERT DUNES HERE IN UAE OTHER THAN DESERT SAFARI'S TRAIN TRACKS.

I learned offroading in 100 series in 2006 and realized its limitations in the first 3-4 months when I knew what I want it after seeing everyone climbing the big red (smallest of 3 peak in shj) and me sitting down as that boat in stock shape going "NOWHERE".

@Jamy B. for such extensive overland trips, you should fly to those country and rent the well equipped 4x4 made for those specific terrain, because you can't enjoy overland vehicle here as they gonna cough up on tall dunes becauase of there size and weight. So buy something for here like FJC or Xterra that you can freely enjoy every week without any headache - at least in this region - UAE, Oman and Saudi.

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Well you have to understand everybody's idea of going to the desert is not just climbing to the top of faya and big red. When you hear the word off road you tunnel vision yourself into thinking bashing dunes and climbing tel morab is the only type of off roading or even desert driving there is.

The person clearly mentions some normal desert driving with an emphasis on exploration and overlanding. 

And nothing better ticks all those boxes than a full size SUV like a 100 series. 

 

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This one word is enough Mr. Tunnel. Read again.

FYI. Intermediate level starts from Bidayer (Big Red) to Sweihan to Qua and ends at Liwa.

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If you are interested one of my friend selling his fully loaded FJ Cruiser. 2016 model and low km. 

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1 hour ago, Gaurav said:

This one word is enough Mr. Tunnel. Read again.

FYI. Intermediate level starts from Bidayer (Big Red) to Sweihan to Qua and ends at Liwa.

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Well I'm sorry if you think a Land Cruiser isn't good enough for more than just newbies. 

I'm sticking to my opinion. I would recommend a Land Cruiser to anyone other than someone who's specific goal was just to do very extreme desert drives. 

 

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8 hours ago, Shamil said:

Thanks for tagging us on this thread @Gauravbhai. Being a person who used to drive a pajero for about 14 years and then switching to the Xterra, i think i can throw some light into this discussion. When i got rid of my pajero(i had a SWB 3.0 and a LWB 3.8), i was in fact, about to purchase a FJC but then the xterra presented itself as a much more viable option in terms of passenger comfort, adequate amount of power for advanced offloading purposes and all in all a more family friendly SUV compared to the FJC. The Xterra, In comparison to the pajero, even though is more powerful (4.0 vs 3.8), surprisingly consumes lesser gas. Yea surprise surprise! Its probably to do with the weight aspect since the xterra is lighter than the 5 door pajero.

Bottom line, the pajero, as @Gauravbhai mentioned, is great for beach cruises and in general a more comfy on-road ride(if passenger hauling and light offroading are the primary objectives). But if you want the best of both worlds whereby you are able to SLIGHTLY compromise on passenger comfort (its almost negligible by the way) and yet require the brute engine strength to go crazy on offroad terrains, then look no more as the xterra clearly has all those boxes beautifully checked off. Only downside being is that you will have to settle for a pre-owned option as production of this vehicle has stopped since 2015.

Thanks for all the detailed info. I remember Gaurav mentioning that the Xterra has been discontinued, and that might make it difficult finding spare parts... is that a huge downside?

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@Jamy B. welcome back. You still have a long way to go to qualify for the intermediate level. Since you've been away for long period you'll have to start all over again. I personally like the 3.8 litre as it offers the rear difflock also. It would be mighty useful if it is a SWB rather than LWB.

In a way I agree with @Gaurav bhai to go with the Xterra, of course a used one and spend money on maintaining, repairing or mods to the car. You don't want to bring in a brand new 100k car to the desert. When you do decide to go for expedition do a little research and rent a fully insured vehicle from that place to help you keep your car safe.

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2 minutes ago, Jamy B. said:

Thanks for all the detailed info. I remember Gaurav mentioning that the Xterra has been discontinued, and that might make it difficult finding spare parts... is that a huge downside?

Any discontinued car usually serve spare parts from at least 10 to max 25 years.

@Shamil and @Emmanuel can confirm what's Nissan SLA with Xterra if they have researched.

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4 hours ago, Gaurav said:

I agree with you @desertdude on 100 series better for overland trips, BUT I strongly disagree to buy 100 series - FULL SIZE BOAT - GOOD FOR NOTHING IN DESERT DUNES HERE IN UAE OTHER THAN DESERT SAFARI'S TRAIN TRACKS.

I learned offroading in 100 series in 2006 and realized its limitations in the first 3-4 months when I knew what I want it after seeing everyone climbing the big red (smallest of 3 peak in shj) and me sitting down as that boat in stock shape going "NOWHERE".

@Jamy B. for such extensive overland trips, you should fly to those country and rent the well equipped 4x4 made for those specific terrain, because you can't enjoy overland vehicle here as they gonna cough up on tall dunes becauase of there size and weight. So buy something for here like FJC or Xterra that you can freely enjoy every week without any headache - at least in this region - UAE, Oman and Saudi.

image.png

True. I need to stop thinking I can use one same car everywhere and for everything :D

It does make sense to get one that will work well for what I actually want and will be using it for here, which is learning off-roading...

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5 hours ago, desertdude said:

Well if you want to overland it. Your best bet would be to get your self a 100 series Land Cruiser. The Xterra and FJC were never launched in Africa, Asia or Europe. 

 If you ever have a breakdown or need some bits out there, good luck finding and parts out in these places for an Xterra or FJC.

It would actually be preferable to get a diesel engine LC 100 but those aren't available here.

And for that budget you can get a pretty decent 100 series plus have money left over to mod jt.

More chances to get parts for an FJC? as it's newer and can get Toyota dealer to bring them... this is just hypothetically speaking.

In the past I had a similar issue driving around Africa in a motorbike (Suzuki DR800) and had to get the needed part sent from Spain... with all the inconvenience that the situation imposed, having to wait for 2 weeks in a village in Gambia :D

Edited by Jamy B.
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