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Emmanuel

Every off road driver must know: why you get stuck?

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Having a refusal or getting completely stuck is something nobody should feel guilty about, since it's part of the off-roading game. It’s also an essential experience in your learning. Somehow, as long as you can understand what happened so you won’t repeat the same mistake over and over, it’s a must to improve.

There are hundreds of reasons why you can get stuck. Some of them don’t directly depend on the driver (it can be related to an engine issue, the terrain, the climate, etc.), while others are just mistakes. Some of them are clear and obvious, others are more unpredictable and difficult to identify…

As a big fan of @Rahimdad’s What Went Wrong ? thread, it came to my mind that we could simply adapt his brilliant idea by analyzing, not accidents, but stucks, and try to make together a list of all the possible reasons behind them.  

Please do share here your guesses, explanations... and videos.

I’ll start easy, with one of my best stucks this year, which happened in Area 53 two weeks ago (I borrowed the footage from @Javier M).

So... who can tell us why I got stuck here ?  

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Guessing.. The car in front slowed down and you took your foot off the accelerator, losing momentum and then stuck.

Hmm..  the car in front looks like a Pathfinder. 

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@Emmanuel I'm you biggest fan and with this thread you have won my heart and sure to win many more. Rightfully no shame and good to learn from such videos.

@WiLfY spot on, sometimes we should leave little extra space in such situations as we cannot be sure how the car in front will react. Once we drive together in a few drives we pick up on drive habits and judgement gets better.

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4 hours ago, Emmanuel said:

Having a refusal or getting completely stuck is something nobody should feel guilty about, since it's part of the off-roading game. It’s also an essential experience in your learning. Somehow, as long as you can understand what happened so you won’t repeat the same mistake over and over, it’s a must to improve.

There are hundreds of reasons why you can get stuck. Some of them don’t directly depend on the driver (it can be related to an engine issue, the terrain, the climate, etc.), while others are just mistakes. Some of them are clear and obvious, others are more unpredictable and difficult to identify…

As a big fan of @Rahimdad’s What Went Wrong ? thread, it came to my mind that we could simply adapt his brilliant idea by analyzing, not accidents, but stucks, and try to make together a list of all the possible reasons behind them.  

Please do share here your guesses, explanations... and videos.

I’ll start easy, with one of my best stucks this year, which happened in Area 53 two weeks ago (I borrowed the footage from @Javier M).

So... who can tell us why I got stuck here ?  

 

And @Javier M was able to manage because he had some distance between for quick reaction. 

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It seems the path was already messed up by the time it was your turn to go there.. I can see the pathfinder barely made it and your car ground clearance was not able to cross through the path because the sand was wet and behaved like mud. 

I think that if you had made it somebody else would have gotten stuck anyway.. 

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Knowing Emmanuel well and driven with him for over 2 years, I think there are two possibilities for this stuck:

  • He carefully moved slightly up to avoid the churned up patch and still slid down, so either his momentum wasn't enough to steer left and up too fast OR
  • His rear tire pressure was more as the car slid down from the back into the churned up patch.
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Let's root for each other & watch each other grow.

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Great team work, guys ! You have covered almost everything. 

@WiLfY you're absolutely right, as you can see on this footage (again sorry for the low quality of the video). The question is why I took my foot off the gas, and here, as pointed by @Rahimdad and @Fuad, it was my mistake : not leaving enough distance with @G.huz's car in front. What happened exactly at this point is that I hesitated to steer more left and accelerate. Seeing the heavy wet sand (the night and the morning before there had been heavy rain and haze, good point @Javier M), I was not sure to be able to climb on the left, and in this case a failure could have led me to slid down and then hit the Pathfinder. Last point, and here  @Gaurav is also right : after this stuck I had to bring down my tire pressure again. One hour earlier I had deflated to 12/12.5 psi, but with the heat (the temperature was high this afternoon), the gauge was now displaying 14. 

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18 hours ago, WiLfY said:

Guessing.. The car in front slowed down and you took your foot off the accelerator, losing momentum and then stuck.

Hmm..  the car in front looks like a Pathfinder. 

I think this is what happened, passing by from the upper side might have lead to other things, maybe bad ones... So thank you @Emmanuel for taking that decision.

I think it's a smart decision to slow down, he was at a good pace and momentum, I ruined it by becoming slow.

I remember I shifted gears to pass that one, it was tricky... @Gaurav was trying to teach us a hard lesson hehe.

It was a wonderful drive, I enjoyed every bit of it, even that stuck of mine, from which I burned like 5000 calories just by turning the steering wheel left and right hahaha

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6 minutes ago, G.huz said:

I think it's a smart decision to slow down, he was at a good pace and momentum, I ruined it by becoming slow.

No you didn’t it was my mistake @G.huz, not your.

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And don’t thank me, actually I also didn’t want my beloved Jawaher (that’s my car’s name) to kiss your car 😘

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