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G.huz

the importance of soft shackles, kinetic rope and solid recovery points

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this is a bit disturbing, but very important lesson... it shows the importance of having a solid recovery points and soft shackles and the kinetic rope.

i got this on whatsapp, you probably got it somehow, since it went viral over whatsapp.

 

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Brilliant share @G.huz

I have received this yesterday while I was out and until now it was in the back of my mind to share and you did it before me.

Like these days soft shackles are must, I think we regularly need to check our tow points for internal corrosion over time.

@Frederic is there any stress test available to see if existing tow hook can be rated against 4-5 tons pull? Just a thought

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Yes man, everyone talks about how importance the kenitic rope and soft shackles, but never imagined it until now.

Super scary, I hope it won't drive off-roaders away from this sport.

This is a core lesson stresses on the very core of Carnity.

@Rahimdad, you're a better expert than I am with Pathfinder, do I need to work on my recovery points? Front and rear?

If they need some work, I need to fix them ASAP.

9 minutes ago, Gaurav said:

Brilliant share @G.huz

I have received this yesterday while I was out and until now it was in the back of my mind to share and you did it before me.

Like these days soft shackles are must, I think we regularly need to check our tow points for internal corrosion over time.

@Frederic is there any stress test available to see if existing tow hook can be rated against 4-5 tons pull? Just a thought

If there's such a thing, that would be awesome

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4 minutes ago, G.huz said:

Yes man, everyone talks about how importance the kenitic rope and soft shackles, but never imagined it until now.

Super scary, I hope it won't drive off-roaders away from this sport.

This is a core lesson stresses on the very core of Carnity.

I’ve seen crazy accidents after being 20 years working in manufacturing industry. Taking into account the crazy amounts of stress load that comes into play when recovering a vehicle, EVERY possible step in minimizing the risk should be considered, and the soft shackles are i god gift in such situations.

i would like to add that it’s advisable to use a sandbag over the tow rope while doing a recovery. I don’t often see that being done here. In this case above, the OEM tow hook would have been dragged to the ground instead of going through the windshield. 

@Gaurav it’s pretty difficult doing a load or stress test to assess your OEM tow hook. But severe corrosion should have been noticed by the owner of the vehicle. 

A test rig could be built by attaching a winch to a tow hook, with a load scale in between like they use on cranes. But this would be only partly accurate or reliable, as the kinetic pulling energy is far more than a steady buildup of force. 

As I mentioned before, kinetic ropes are a fantastic tool, but as you feel the jerking feeling less, people often pull like crazy, and the kinetic snap-back is really extremely forceful and puts great stress at factory tow points. Again stressing the fact that kinetic pulling should be slowly built up in 2-3 attempts.  

Very sad to see what happened there and makes me realize again the forces at play🤕

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A sandbag is a good option, but in this case the recovery point flew in rocket speed.

As am thinking, maybe another rope holding the main one would somehow work like a sandbad, it would hold back the main rope and whatever it's carrying from flying.

Idon't know, am just thinking of work arounds to prevent this from happening.

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@G.huz great share, we shout this from Newbie level and stress the importance as we have seen so many cases in our years. I can't say that specific Pathfinder needs any changes for the tow points. I was lucky to get mine from a friend who used it off road only once and it was properly protected against rust. Each car bought second hand must be checked for rust and corrosion as you never know how the previous owner has taken care of his ride or not.

We try to take all precautions and that is why till a certain level we don't allow recoveries to be done by newbie or Fewbie level. Those observing the recovery should also be away from the radius of the rope. A sand bag is a good idea and in extreme recoveries we have used those or the sling to protect in case of breakage.

So far Shukar Alhamdolillah there have been no such cases in the Carnity club and we would like to continue it that way.

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Where is @shadow79 he knows all about solid mounting points 😂

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My own reflections on this:  

-          What have failed in this case is not the tow hook, it seems the bolts. Then I see a locally fabricated bar, like the one on the land cruiser, I always get worried. I have too many times seen bars being fixed using the bolts of the regular tow points. If that is the case, the high-tensile rated factory bolts might have been too short and did not have enough of threads. The bolts might even have been replaced with local none rated longer bolts. The bolt might not have been tightened and therefore bent before ripped off.

-          Even if it seems not have been the issue in this case, the factory front hooks on the 100 series land cruiser are rubbish and should be replaced. It bends after a few recoveries. Unless you like to go after market recovery points, both the 105 and the 70 series have factory recovery points with the same bolt pattern. The 100 series cruiser is not the only car with bad factory points. Possibly something the club could support and recommend?

-          I do fully agree on using soft shackles were possible. The less iron that comes flying, the better it is.

-          Many of us knows very well the strengths and the weaknesses of our own cars. We know what point to use and we have ensured the bolts are high tensile rated. But how can we ensure the car you are recovering are properly setup? If it fails in the other end, you get it in your wind screen.

-          We often have the debate on recovering from the front or the back. Some time you have no option depending on how the car is stuck. From the recovery vehicle point of view, you also have weaknesses and benefits. Pulling from the back going forward might put less strain on your drive train. It might also provide some better safety. Pulling from the front reversing on the other hand provides better visibility and control.

-          I also have a good experience using bridle. The main benefit is that you divide the force on two points and the risk for failure is less. But if you get a failure, the friction is high enough to take the tension away. It only takes a moment longer to rig

Image result for bridle snatch strap

(picture stolen from the WEB)

-          A safety strap also comes handy. It doesn’t divide the force, but it stops things from flying.

 

Will be pleased to share my experiences if anyone would be interested. :-)

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We always like to share and listen everyone's experiences, please go ahead @M.K with your inputs. 

I used safety straps on both sides on stubborn stucks if car doesn't come out in first 2-3 attempts or if I need to give harder tug to reposition the car.

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