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G.huz

the importance of soft shackles, kinetic rope and solid recovery points

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The rear tow points are solid have pulled up things More then the weight of the car with that

but can't say that for the front ones but they are sufficient for the weight of the car in a stuck scenario

It's in some dreamy plans that if I see a good and CHEAP hook for the front I could place it in the center along with the cross support...

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53 minutes ago, Frederic said:

@Rahimdad @G.huz the second generation Pathfinder is unibody. Did you add recovery points or how do you rate the existing ones ?

@shadow79 same for the Rav4.

 

I don't know what unibody is, I only have stock ones, I didn't add any... But why do we have to? As unibody cars?

"Winter is coming" though, I better check them soon before the season starts.

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7 minutes ago, G.huz said:

I don't know what unibody is, I only have stock ones, I didn't add any... But why do we have to? As unibody cars?

"Winter is coming" though, I better check them soon before the season starts.

 

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1 hour ago, Javier M said:

 

yes, i googled afterwards... but still, if the original ones are good, do we have to add new points?

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@G.huz don't worry buddy, i am pretty sure that the Pathfinder, as it's a very capable offroading machine, has very decent tow points, even though its built on unibody frame. 

Taking care of below points can definitely minimize the risks involved:

1) Inspect your OEM recovery points (not tie-down points), and see if they are still in good shape (not bent, no severe corrosion). 

2) Never exceed 15-20km/h when engaging in a pull or tug. Do several smaller tugs and slowly buildup the force.

3) Using soft shackles is at least less material flying around. 

4) Divide the force whenever possible with a bridle configuration.

As mentioned before on Carnity, you can install the app called Wreckmaster, which is being used by professional recovery companies to assess the weight involved, based on the angle, weight of the vehicle, and surface resistance. While this gives you merely a number, it will help you to understand the difficulty rating of the recovery.

Some examples from the app:

* A 2 ton vehicle which is stuck on flat hard grass or gravel only takes 100 kg to tow.

* A 2 ton vehicle which is stuck in flat sand with all wheels will take 2000 kg to tow.

* A 2 ton vehicle which is stuck in a pocket with its wheels and needs to be pulled upwards on an angle of 20°will need 2667 kg to tow.

As the 2003 Pathfinder has a theoretical towing capacity of 5000lbs, or 2267kg, this would mean that the third example is taking more stress than what the vehicle in theory is built for. Of course these are calculations, and there are safety margins on the vehicle, and the kinetic energy also comes into play, but it is imho a good indication to see how far you will need to push your vehicle to do the third scenario.

 

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5 minutes ago, Frederic said:

@G.huz don't worry buddy, i am pretty sure that the Pathfinder, as it's a very capable offroading machine, has very decent tow points, even though its built on unibody frame. 

Taking care of below points can definitely minimize the risks involved:

1) Inspect your OEM recovery points (not tie-down points), and see if they are still in good shape (not bent, no severe corrosion). 

2) Never exceed 15-20km/h when engaging in a pull or tug. Do several smaller tugs and slowly buildup the force.

3) Using soft shackles is at least less material flying around. 

4) Divide the force whenever possible with a bridle configuration.

As mentioned before on Carnity, you can install the app called Wreckmaster, which is being used by professional recovery companies to assess the weight involved, based on the angle, weight of the vehicle, and surface resistance. While this gives you merely a number, it will help you to understand the difficulty rating of the recovery.

Some examples from the app:

* A 2 ton vehicle which is stuck on flat hard grass or gravel only takes 100 kg to tow.

* A 2 ton vehicle which is stuck in flat sand with all wheels will take 2000 kg to tow.

* A 2 ton vehicle which is stuck in a pocket with its wheels and needs to be pulled upwards on an angle of 20°will need 2667 kg to tow.

As the 2003 Pathfinder has a theoretical towing capacity of 5000lbs, or 2267kg, this would mean that the third example is taking more stress than what the vehicle in theory is built for. Of course these are calculations, and there are safety margins on the vehicle, and the kinetic energy also comes into play, but it is imho a good indication to see how far you will need to push your vehicle to do the third scenario.

 

duuuuuuuude... this is super, thank you

i need to check my recovery points, and am getting this extra short rope between 2 points for sure

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46 minutes ago, Frederic said:

2) Never exceed 15-20km/h when engaging in a pull or tug. Do several smaller tugs and slowly buildup the force.

This single point is a GOLDEN MANTRA, even if you are stuck in a situation with underrated tow points, hook or ropes.

I remember giving more than 30 tugs to change the angle of Ford truck with my dinky Pajero.

Out here ppl give up after 3-4 tries and go as fast as they can, but its a same logic of blip blip recovery method, if you are moving even an inch at a time, you still have a hope to recover with the same intensity by giving constant slow powered tugs.

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10 minutes ago, Gaurav said:

Out here ppl give up after 3-4 tries and go as fast as they can, but its a same logic of blip blip recovery method, if you are moving even an inch at a time, you still have a hope to recover with the same intensity by giving constant slow powered tugs.

 

On another off-road club I remember seeing a video where they were recovering a car, they guy was clearly going too fast when pulling and one of the recovery points broke, sending it directly through the other car's window. And they were blaming the recovery points as faulty. The stucked car had the axles covered in sand and this guy was pulling too fast. 🤨

Needless to say I did not join them, they obviously did not know what they were doing.

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1 hour ago, Frederic said:

2) Never exceed 15-20km/h when engaging in a pull or tug. Do several smaller tugs and slowly buildup the force.

Oh yes ! 

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36 minutes ago, Javier M said:

On another off-road club I remember seeing a video where they were recovering a car, they guy was clearly going too fast when pulling and one of the recovery points broke, sending it directly through the other car's window. And they were blaming the recovery points as faulty. The stucked car had the axles covered in sand and this guy was pulling too fast. 🤨

Needless to say I did not join them, they obviously did not know what they were doing.

Actually people have ego attached to the recovery scenario that let their mind stop using the basic common sense, physics and math.

Also they assume if you fail to recover in small 10 tugs then you and your 4x4 is useless, and let someone show you how to do it.

Not many are bother to clear the sand around wheels and make a path or hole near the tire so that car can fall into the hole safely than jumping out and increasing the risk of flip.

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