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Gaurav

Pajero coolant expansion bottle turn brown

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@treks makes a valid point. I too have my doubts about it being sand in the system. For one grain of sand to get sucked into an overflow pipe is something, for a handful of sand to get sucked in is something else. The only way you’re going to get loads of sand in the expansion bottle is if there’s a big hole in it and sand is constantly getting kicked up around it, in which case the bottle would be leaking coolant everywhere. 

Waterless coolant is the way forward. I would put it in everything if the customers were willing to pay for it but they don’t understand, they just chase the smallest price. It’s simple to use but you need someone who knows what they’re doing. I’ve only seen it used in uae maybe 7-8 times and every time it’s been me who used it. First the system is flushed with a special fluid which removes every trace of water from the system. Then it’s filled with waterless coolant. The flushing fluid isn’t a big issue because you can filter it and use it over and over. Then you have the issue if you ever take the car to one of the small roadside garages, the “mechanics” won’t understand it and will properly top it up with “red coolant because it’s the best”. It’s all the little things and bits of knowledge like this why I charge 3 times more than most mechanics in Dubai. If you want to save money in the short term, go to rashidiya, if you want to pay a little bit more and save money in the long term, come to me. 

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2 hours ago, Barry said:

@treks makes a valid point. I too have my doubts about it being sand in the system. For one grain of sand to get sucked into an overflow pipe is something, for a handful of sand to get sucked in is something else. The only way you’re going to get loads of sand in the expansion bottle is if there’s a big hole in it and sand is constantly getting kicked up around it, in which case the bottle would be leaking coolant everywhere. 

Waterless coolant is the way forward. I would put it in everything if the customers were willing to pay for it but they don’t understand, they just chase the smallest price. It’s simple to use but you need someone who knows what they’re doing. I’ve only seen it used in uae maybe 7-8 times and every time it’s been me who used it. First the system is flushed with a special fluid which removes every trace of water from the system. Then it’s filled with waterless coolant. The flushing fluid isn’t a big issue because you can filter it and use it over and over. Then you have the issue if you ever take the car to one of the small roadside garages, the “mechanics” won’t understand it and will properly top it up with “red coolant because it’s the best”. It’s all the little things and bits of knowledge like this why I charge 3 times more than most mechanics in Dubai. If you want to save money in the short term, go to rashidiya, if you want to pay a little bit more and save money in the long term, come to me. 

Not a fan of waterless coolant, there was a time I was really interested in it but after doing a little digging not so much. First of all they run make the engine hotter than normal, don't extract heat as efficiently as regular coolant does, which really can't be a good thing in these parts specially for folk who go out dune bashing regularly.

Have read in some cases the cylinder heads can run upto 40C hotter specially when being pushed not to mention its stupid expensive, you pop a leak somewhere and you are done for plus more $$$$ to refill it. In this temp your aux fans or clutchfan will most probably be on all the time. the car thinking its overheating, robbing you of HP and wearing out the fans quicker. Already heat prematurely kills everything under the hood from belts to hoses and all sorts of other plastic bits and bobs, this added heat build up they will just accelerate the process.

Newer cars run hot as is very close to overheating temps anyways because of emissions add extra heat to the system and probably throw the ECU off thinking its running lean or something making all sorts of other problems.

If it was such a great product I'm sure it would have caught on by now, because waterless coolant has been around for quite a while now and maybe even coming from factory on some cars. ok fine not on cheap econo-boxes because of cost but some of the highend luxury rides which cost millions, like Bentleys, Rolls etc etc

So yeah thanks but no thanks! 

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18 minutes ago, desertdude said:

Not a fan of waterless coolant, there was a time I was really interested in it but after doing a little digging not so much. First of all they run make the engine hotter than normal, don't extract heat as efficiently as regular coolant does, which really can't be a good thing in these parts specially for folk who go out dune bashing regularly.

Have read in some cases the cylinder heads can run upto 40C hotter specially when being pushed not to mention its stupid expensive, you pop a leak somewhere and you are done for plus more $$$$ to refill it. In this temp your aux fans or clutchfan will most probably be on all the time. the car thinking its overheating, robbing you of HP and wearing out the fans quicker. Already heat prematurely kills everything under the hood from belts to hoses and all sorts of other plastic bits and bobs, this added heat build up they will just accelerate the process.

Newer cars run hot as is very close to overheating temps anyways because of emissions add extra heat to the system and probably throw the ECU off thinking its running lean or something making all sorts of other problems.

If it was such a great product I'm sure it would have caught on by now, because waterless coolant has been around for quite a while now and maybe even coming from factory on some cars. ok fine not on cheap econo-boxes because of cost but some of the highend luxury rides which cost millions, like Bentleys, Rolls etc etc

So yeah thanks but no thanks! 

Some people don’t understand engine temperatures. I would quite happily run an engine up to 150 degrees if it had the proper coolant. 

Temperature isn’t an issue when it comes to engine cooling. I see so many people shit their pants if their temperature gauge reads 95 and they think they need a full rebuild. 

Running hot and overheating are 2 different things and I don’t think most people here understand the difference. Just because your temperature gauge hits the red doesn’t mean you overheated. 

Overheating is when the coolant boils. It creates air bubbles in the system which creates hot spots, which is why gaskets fail, they expand at different rates. 

I would have no problem running an engine to 150 degrees with waterless coolant. Running hot and overheating are 2 different things 

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10 minutes ago, Barry said:

Some people don’t understand engine temperatures. I would quite happily run an engine up to 150 degrees if it had the proper coolant. 

Temperature isn’t an issue when it comes to engine cooling. I see so many people shit their pants if their temperature gauge reads 95 and they think they need a full rebuild. 

Running hot and overheating are 2 different things and I don’t think most people here understand the difference. Just because your temperature gauge hits the red doesn’t mean you overheated. 

Overheating is when the coolant boils. It creates air bubbles in the system which creates hot spots, which is why gaskets fail, they expand at different rates. 

I would have no problem running an engine to 150 degrees with waterless coolant. Running hot and overheating are 2 different things 

Each to his own mate, while you you wouldn't have any issues running such a hot motor I definitely would. Specially if I'm using my car for some serious off roading, It for sure can't be good for the motor or even engine internals, specially nowadays with plastic water pump impellers, timing chain guide rails, etc etc. You are just aging them much faster also slowly cooking your engine and transmission oil and transmission too, since there are many cars where the ATF is cooled from engine coolant. Like the ZF 5HP transmission which is "overheating" at 135 C and the Trans ECU throws a Trans overheat msg and goes in limp mode. 

So yeah once again thanks but no thanks :) And like I said if it was such a good thing it would be coming from the factory in at least one car. Right now I'm not aware of any.

 

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I had unfortunate few hours on the day of Eid for running hot the water jacket on the block leaked spilling all the water mixed with Lil bit of coolent while on my way back from AUD as it reached the red mark I would just switch off the engine and be coasting until the speed dropped real low the start it again and acclerate back up to 100 or 120 all the while keeping and eye on the heat gauge and once in awhile parking to refill water up...was a crazy day

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I use waterless coolants in my cars, and I have not seen them running hotter than normal. However, I keep forgetting that I don't live in a desert, so I agree with @desertdude on this one- I would not use these coolants in extreme temperature conditions, either. 

Nonetheless, if I were in Gaurav's shoes, I would flush the cooling system several times, before refilling with Mitsubishi-approved coolant mixed in the correct proportions to achieve the right specific gravity for the mix. Then, I would never add any other brand, formulation, or concentration of coolant- ever. 

The best way to preserve the coolants efficiency is to mix a small amount in the correct proportions, and then to add the mixture to the system to top off the coolant level, as opposed to adding either pure coolant or pure water- both of which could and probably will, change the mixture's density, and hence, its effectiveness.   

Edited by treks
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5 hours ago, treks said:

I use waterless coolants in my cars, and I have not seen them running hotter than normal. However, I keep forgetting that I don't live in a desert, so I agree with @desertdude on this one- I would not use these coolants in extreme temperature conditions, either. 

Nonetheless, if I were in Gaurav's shoes, I would flush the cooling system several times, before refilling with Mitsubishi-approved coolant mixed in the correct proportions to achieve the right specific gravity for the mix. Then, I would never add any other brand, formulation, or concentration of coolant- ever. 

The best way to preserve the coolants efficiency is to mix a small amount in the correct proportions, and then to add the mixture to the system to top off the coolant level, as opposed to adding either pure coolant or pure water- both of which could and probably will, change the mixture's density, and hence, its effectiveness.   

Yeah and not to mention regular dune bashing trips to the desert where they are pushed hard on a regular basis or being stuck for endless hours in stop and crawl traffic in the blistering sun in 50C + ambient temperatures.

 

 

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