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Here is the four square method, with which car dealers steal your money on all 4 sides of the game. Very nicely explained in this viral video.

Share the list of scam you have seen here with car dealers.

 

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Just found another great video to avoid car dealers scam of fake fees and charges to avoid

 

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Nome of this is relevant here in the UAE. If you are buying in the US then yes but not here. 

Dealers scam you here in many other ways but since Big B is always watching not to going to mention them here.

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Well to me buying a new car itself is a big no to lose half the value in the first 2-3 years. If you are fine to lose that 50% of the car value, then these petty charges or fees wouldn't hurt you much.

It's a known fact now that any car dealer in the world make more money servicing it than selling it. That's why service advisors are trained to upsell so hard for their commissions. 

I have been upsold once with a service advisor that my brake drum thickness is 5MM in place of a new drum of 6MM. I spent 4k dirhams and learned my lesson hard way, that I could have driven for another 2 more years without needing new brake drums. 

After that instance, I always read the owners manual and go and tell them what exactly I want than their suggestions.

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This is due to lack of knowledge on the owners part, which kind of boggles me. For an expat their vehicle is in the top three of their most expensive assets in this country yet they don't even bother to learn one thing about about it. 

You'll see people do more research on a rental flat before renting it than before buying a car or anything to keep it running well after they have. 

 

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This is the real car dealers scam, to make you fool and scare. watch till the end

I knw video is frm canada but this happen everwhere if owner has no clue like @desertdude mentioned

 

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Happened with me when I bought my first car in the UAE. Never thought it could happen here, I only found out when i took it to the dealership for service...

 

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I was lucky to buy a brand new Toyota Echo bact in 2001 off the showroom floor. I was advised by a friend to buy from the Abu Dhabi showroom which saved me AED 1500/- which is lot in terms of a AED 35500/- car. I spent AED 4500/- on a 60k kms service contract. Not once was a cheated by them.

I recommended @Brette to see a service manager in Jeep who had done fair jobs for my Jeep Commander at fair prices. However his experience has been different although initially he did get helped, but one of the services he had done all the checks had not been carried out, but all the boxes were ticked. Maybe @Brette would further like to share his experience.

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Well, seeing these articles being a Maintenance Manager myself, i realized there are three ways of maintaining a car or machine, and it depends mainly on your own personality, technical knowledge, and priorities:

1) Strictly by the book and top notch: You take care of the car like it's your baby, and many parts that you get replaced are not necessarily due for replacement. But you want to have ease of mind and keep the car in super condition. Every rattle or slight problem will make you go to the workshop or dealer and you are not afraid of spending some extra bucks until the car is back in optimal condition. You have a good resale value in mind and would even keep the plastics on the seats.

2) Cost-conscious but correct: You prefer a decent workshop and want to get the necessary stuff done, but you are not afraid to push back a bit and discuss prices and necessity of replacing certain parts. 

3) Drive it into the ground: You replace the oil when the min. oil level indicator comes on, you don't care about the basic maintenance and you flip the cars in a few years and want to spend less than the minimum on it. As long as it drives and there is a bit of rubber on the tyres you're good to go.

You'd think that these 3 ways are correlated to your income, but strangely enough they are not. I've met very rich people that don't want to spend an extra buck and drive their cars into the ground. I've also met people that need to count thrice to get by, but are still creative to get the best maintenance done at the best price, and keep their cars in very good condition.

One thing i genuinely hate is people that start discussions with their mechanics without even getting themselves informed in advance. They hardly know how a car works, yet they want to constantly criticize a professional. One should always be respectful and ask questions and get themselves informed first instead of bashing on the mechanic. (sorry i am venting now).

 

 

Edited by Frederic
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2 hours ago, Frederic said:

 

One thing i genuinely hate is people that start discussions with their mechanics without even getting themselves informed in advance. They hardly know how a car works, yet they want to constantly criticize a professional. One should always be respectful and ask questions and get themselves informed first instead of bashing on the mechanic. (sorry i am venting now).

 

 

I used to deal with this a lot as a mechanic, especially when I worked in smaller garages. I don’t mind taking time to explain things to people who want to learn but when someone tries to tell me my job when they obviously don’t have a clue it makes my dung boil.  I’m a lot more chilled out these days but a couple of times in the past I’ve pointed a customer to a tool box and said ok, you fix then.

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