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UAE'S MOST ENGAGING CAR SITE

Derick

Tesla roadside recovery for electric charging

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Wondering to know how does Tesla and other electric cars deals with no charge situation in the middle of the road? 

Or maybe in some deserted land where nearest charger showing 100 miles away?

And please I meant for UAE and not US.

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I think IMC or other recovery service provider have some quick charging service. Worst case scenario, put the car on recovery bed and drop them to the nearest charging point.

It's better to check with the provider (Tesla or any) that what are there terms for roadside assistance.

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I believe we are over thinking about the electric cars. It has no difference than petrol. So far i never ended up on the road having no petrol. Always filled before it finished. Same for the electrical cars also. When it shows less battery you can stop in anywhere having electric and charge your car before batteries fully finished. 

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19 minutes ago, sertac said:

I believe we are over thinking about the electric cars. It has no difference than petrol. So far i never ended up on the road having no petrol. Always filled before it finished. Same for the electrical cars also. When it shows less battery you can stop in anywhere having electric and charge your car before batteries fully finished. 

That's the thing you just can't charge anywhere. How many charging ports across the UAE?

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1 minute ago, desertdude said:

That's the thing you just can't charge anywhere. How many charging ports across the UAE?

And even when we will have enough ports, then the commercialization will kill this whole concept.

Only ABC brand can charge here, Only XYZ subscriber can charge there, different plugs, different rates and what not.

Experience this last summer in London with Hybrid and couldn't able to charge once in 14 days as every port was different and want me to sign up for monthly option than pay as you go.

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Tesla has two options if I remember correctly:

either the fast-charge option which only works on special Tesla charging points.

or the regular 220volt plug. This however will take many hours to recharge but is how you recharge from your home at night. 

Amongst the management in our company we already agreed that whoever buys the first electric car, we will install a free charging station at our parking area. 

So with a radius of 3 to 400kms and the ability to charge overnight, the only time your electric car might become an issue when taking long trips to Oman or something. But even then there are workarounds for that. 

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I’d like to see someone invent an emergency battery pack, something like the size of the old style battery boosters that you could carry around in the boot like you would carry a Jerry can of petrol. Not a full charge, but enough to get you to the charging point. 

I don’t think it’s such a major issue anyway. You can stick a high wattage inverter in the breakdown trucks which can be used to charge the dead car enough to get it to the charging point. 

But, I think @sertac is right. Treat it like a petrol car, watch the fuel (electricity) gauge and don’t let it run out  you wouldn’t let your car run out of petrol, why would you let it run out of electricity. 

I think the electric car companies are missing out on a trick putting solar panels of the roof of the cars. It won’t generate massive power but you could leave your car in the parking lot when you’re at work and get a little boost. 

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25 minutes ago, Barry said:

I’d like to see someone invent an emergency battery pack, something like the size of the old style battery boosters that you could carry around in the boot like you would carry a Jerry can of petrol. Not a full charge, but enough to get you to the charging point. 

I don’t think it’s such a major issue anyway. You can stick a high wattage inverter in the breakdown trucks which can be used to charge the dead car enough to get it to the charging point. 

But, I think @sertac is right. Treat it like a petrol car, watch the fuel (electricity) gauge and don’t let it run out  you wouldn’t let your car run out of petrol, why would you let it run out of electricity. 

I think the electric car companies are missing out on a trick putting solar panels of the roof of the cars. It won’t generate massive power but you could leave your car in the parking lot when you’re at work and get a little boost. 

On a 60kwh Tesla, that would mean you’d need about 6000 watts during one hour to charge the battery 10%.

if you’d wanna recharge 10% within a half hour, you’re looking at 12000 watts. 

You’re looking at a pretty big inverter in that case. Most commercial  12 to 220V inverters are around 2000 watts.

solar panels are virtually useless on the roof of your car as they only generate around 250 Watts per sqm surface area. That would mean 24 hours of full sun to trickle your battery to 10% 

See below article:

Tesla says the 60-kwh battery provides a range of up to 232 miles (the EPA pegs it at 208 miles), and the 85-kwh battery (a $10,000 option) provides up to 300 miles (the EPA puts it at 265 miles). Here are some examples for recharging times: With a single onboard charger plugged into a standard 110-volt outlet, Tesla says you will get 5 miles of range for every hour of charging. From zero to 300 miles would take about 52 hours at that rate. With a single onboard charger connected to a 240-volt outlet, which Tesla recommends, the pace can reach speeds up to 31 miles of range for each hour of charging, meaning a full 300-mile charge takes less than 9.5 hours.

This maximum charge rate from an outlet requires a 240-volt circuit with 40 amps of current. (Adapters allow the supplied charging cord, called a Mobile Connector, to be used with multiple 240-volt outlets [as well as 120 volts], but the charge rate is slower with lower-amp circuits at this voltage.)

Step up to twin chargers in the car and connect to a 240-volt, 90-amp high-power wall charger (an extra-cost charging unit called a Wall Connector, not just a 240-volt line) and the charging speed zooms to 62 miles of range per hour, and the total charging time drops to less than 4 hours, 45 minutes.

Because Teslas require this additional Wall Connector hardware only for the fastest home charging — and don’t rely on external Level 2 chargers — Model S owners can recharge where many electric vehicles cannot. Conversely, Tesla owners can recharge at public Level 2 stations using an adapter, but the charging speed again depends on how many amps the station provides. Most public charging stations can recharge the Model S at the rate of 22 miles of range per hour of charging.

Really in a hurry? Stop at a Tesla Superchargerstation and you can achieve a full charge with 300 miles of range in just an hour, as long as your Model S is configured with Supercharger capability. The high-voltage, direct-current Supercharger system is compelling, but don’t try to buy one for your home. It requires 480 volts to deliver up to 120 kilowatts and would cost too much to justify.

You can learn more about the Model S in our review of the 2012 model, here. When that review was written, Tesla was planning to offer a less-expensive model with a 40-kwh battery, but that model and battery were cut from the lineup.

 

Edited by Frederic
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15 minutes ago, Frederic said:

On a 60kwh Tesla, that would mean you’d need about 6000 watts during one hour to charge the battery 10%.

if you’d wanna recharge 10% within a half hour, you’re looking at 12000 watts. 

You’re looking at a pretty big inverter in that case. Most commercial  12 to 220V inverters are around 2000 watts.

solar panels are virtually useless on the roof of your car as they only generate around 250 Watts per sqm surface area. That would mean 24 hours of full sun to trickle your battery to 10% 

See below article:

Tesla says the 60-kwh battery provides a range of up to 232 miles (the EPA pegs it at 208 miles), and the 85-kwh battery (a $10,000 option) provides up to 300 miles (the EPA puts it at 265 miles). Here are some examples for recharging times: With a single onboard charger plugged into a standard 110-volt outlet, Tesla says you will get 5 miles of range for every hour of charging. From zero to 300 miles would take about 52 hours at that rate. With a single onboard charger connected to a 240-volt outlet, which Tesla recommends, the pace can reach speeds up to 31 miles of range for each hour of charging, meaning a full 300-mile charge takes less than 9.5 hours.

This maximum charge rate from an outlet requires a 240-volt circuit with 40 amps of current. (Adapters allow the supplied charging cord, called a Mobile Connector, to be used with multiple 240-volt outlets [as well as 120 volts], but the charge rate is slower with lower-amp circuits at this voltage.)

Step up to twin chargers in the car and connect to a 240-volt, 90-amp high-power wall charger (an extra-cost charging unit called a Wall Connector, not just a 240-volt line) and the charging speed zooms to 62 miles of range per hour, and the total charging time drops to less than 4 hours, 45 minutes.

Because Teslas require this additional Wall Connector hardware only for the fastest home charging — and don’t rely on external Level 2 chargers — Model S owners can recharge where many electric vehicles cannot. Conversely, Tesla owners can recharge at public Level 2 stations using an adapter, but the charging speed again depends on how many amps the station provides. Most public charging stations can recharge the Model S at the rate of 22 miles of range per hour of charging.

Really in a hurry? Stop at a Tesla Superchargerstation and you can achieve a full charge with 300 miles of range in just an hour, as long as your Model S is configured with Supercharger capability. The high-voltage, direct-current Supercharger system is compelling, but don’t try to buy one for your home. It requires 480 volts to deliver up to 120 kilowatts and would cost too much to justify.

You can learn more about the Model S in our review of the 2012 model, here. When that review was written, Tesla was planning to offer a less-expensive model with a 40-kwh battery, but that model and battery were cut from the lineup.

 

Ok, plan B, equip the recovery trucks with small generators capable of producing 12kW. If you can get a 10% charge in 30 minutes, it should be enough to take you where you need to go. 

People (recovery companies) need to think about stuff like this because this is where the industry will eventually lead to. 

BTW, my ideas are trademarked and patented. If anyone want to use them, I need 51% profit share 😬

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9 minutes ago, Barry said:

Ok, plan B, equip the recovery trucks with small generators capable of producing 12kW. If you can get a 10% charge in 30 minutes, it should be enough to take you where you need to go. 

People (recovery companies) need to think about stuff like this because this is where the industry will eventually lead to. 

BTW, my ideas are trademarked and patented. If anyone want to use them, I need 51% profit share 😬

And the funny thing is that these generators will be running on petrol or diesel 😂 

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