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Last night while driving I notice that the Check Engine Light came on all of sudden. Initially I couldn't understand but after searching little bit I now confoirm that its check engine light. 

Of course I step out and open the hood and check that engine is there, just kidding. Inspect all around for any leaks, let car cool down and check the engine oil level seems normal.

What else Im missing and how to fix this light? How much it may cost and how long it will take fix? Can i drive now or is it urgent? Any VW suggested mechanic here>

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Can you answer these please:

  • Which year model
  • How many kms driven
  • From how long you have this car?
  • When and where it was last serviced?
  • Which engine oil do you use?
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12 minutes ago, ABDULLAH19 said:

2014

122000

1 year

2 months back at enoc

dont know

Hey Abdullah, 

Best is to take it to your garage which you regularly go to for repairs and ask them for an OBD Scan, they'll be able to find the fault code through the computer.

Cheers, 

Jas

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The check engine light is part of your car’s so-called onboard diagnostics system. Since the 1980s, computers increasingly have controlled and monitored vehicle performance, regulating such variables as engine speed, fuel mixture, and ignition timing. In modern cars, a computer also tells the automatic transmission when to shift.

 

When it finds a problem in the electronic-control system that it can’t correct, a computer turns on a yellow warning indicator labeled “check engine,” “service engine soon,” or “check powertrain.” Or the light may be nothing more than a picture of an engine, perhaps with the word “check.”

In addition to turning on the light—known as the International Check Engine Symbol—the computer stores a “trouble code” in its memory that identifies the source of the problem, such as a malfunctioning sensor or a misfiring engine. The code can be read with an electronic scan tool or a diagnostic computer—standard equipment in auto repair shops. There are also a number of relatively inexpensive code readers that are designed for do-it-yourselfers.

The code will typically just point you in the direction of the problem, and still requires an experienced professional to fully diagnose and repair the issue. 

if the check engine light illuminates, it will either blink or remain constantly illuminated, depending on the problem. A blinking light, or in some cars a red light instead of a yellow or orange light, indicates a problem that needs immediate attention. Either way, you should have the vehicle checked by a mechanic. 

In late-model cars, a blinking light usually indicates an engine misfire so severe that unburned fuel is being dumped into the exhaust system, where it can quickly damage the catalytic converter, leading to an expensive repair. If that happens, you should reduce power and have the car or truck looked at as soon as possible.

If the light is steady, the problem is not an emergency, but you should schedule an appointment as soon as possible. Today’s automotive computers often try to compensate when there’s a problem, so you might not notice deterioration in performance, even though your fuel mileage might be suffering and your vehicle emitting unacceptable levels of hydrocarbons and other pollutants.

If the check engine light comes on, here are some tips on what you should do:

  • Look for a serious problem that requires immediate attention. Check your dashboard gauges and lights for indications of low oil pressure or overheating. These conditions mean you should pull over and shut off the engine as soon as you can find a safe place to do so. On some cars, a yellow check engine light means investigate the problem and a red one means stop right now.
  • Try tightening your gas cap. This can often solve the problem. Keep in mind that it may take several trips before the light resets. Some vehicles have a separate indicator that warns of a loose gas cap.
  • Reduce speed and load. If the check engine light is blinking or you notice any serious performance problems, such as a loss of power, reduce your speed and try to reduce the demands on the engine. For example, it would be a good idea to stop towing a trailer. Have the car checked as soon as possible to prevent expensive damage.
  • Use built-in diagnostic services, if available. Many modern cars have integrated remote diagnostic capabilities, with the ability to report on trouble codes and schedule a service appointment. Today, many automakers—including Fiat Chrysler, Ford, Hyundai, Jaguar/Land Rover, and Volvo—support remote diagnostics and the ability to schedule a service appointment. 
 

 

 

 

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Check engine lights (CELs) draw various reactions from car users, from immediate panic to utter ignorance. But if you have a check engine light on, there are two possibilities that you need to consider: whether your check engine light is flashing or stable. The former would almost always happen when you are driving the car and represents a computer system emergency. This means that if such a thing happens to you, pull over at the nearest safe location and call roadside assistance. If you get a stable check engine light while you are driving, pull over at the next exit and examine your engine bay.

  • Make sure your petrol tank filler cap is on tightly.
  • Your car’s mass airflow sensor is located upstream from the throttle body, and has a wire attached with a coupler. A clogged MAF sensor can be easily cleaned with a Mass Airflow Cleaner spray.
  • Check your air filter to make sure it isn’t clogged.
  • Refer to the level markings on your coolant reservoir too make sure it is full. Then, turn on your engine and wait for the thermostat switch to open the valve. Your cooling fan will come on immediately when the valve opens. Coolant level should not fall below the minimum mark on the reservoir. If it does, add the appropriate water-coolant mixture to the radiator.
  • Inspect your cooling fan to ensure that it intermittently turns on and off. Whether your car is equipped with one or two fans, both must come on when you turn on the air conditioner.
  • If both fans are continuously on with the air conditioner turned off, this is indicative of a bad coolant temperature sensor.

The check engine light is your car's computer trying to communicate with you about an error or malfunction that has been encountered. The appropriate and requisite response to a check engine light is a comprehensive scan through the On-Board Diagnostic port. OBD-I error codes are displayed when you turn on the ignition, as a flashing light. Count the number of times that the light flashes, and that’s your error code number. OBD-II module is both a memory and control unit for your car's computer, and requires a scan tool for diagnosis. You can always do the scan yourself with the right scan tool and your vehicle's service manual. But an experienced technician will have complex diagnostic equipment and a better chance of solving the issue with the minimum amount of effort and money. Some codes like for airbags and emissions control systems can only be removed with advanced (and expensive) tools by a technician or at the dealership.

Preventive measures to prevent engine malfunction

  • Change your engine oil at the appropriate interval. If you don’t know what that is, and if you have an older car, check with car owners manual.
  • Flush the cooling system once every 5 years and fill up with new coolant.
  • Check your engine often. tug gently on all couplers to see if they are on tightly.
  • Ensure that your battery terminals are clean.
  • Inspect oil and coolant regularly, check for discoloration and change in consistency.

Ignoring a check engine light is like knowing you have high blood pressure and refusing blood tests or medication. Small issues can spiral into catastrophes that may render your vehicle useless or too expensive to repair. In any case, having a check engine light on means that your car is not in its best shape, which means that it will not give you the performance and efficiency that it was designed for. Most people will avoid getting their car scanned because the scan itself costs money and their car runs fine. But in such cases, it is either a problem that is a disaster waiting to happen, or it is just a sensor failure. While the former may set you back by a few hundred to thousands of dirhams, the latter will cause your car to run in a worst-case scenario sort of way. For example, if your check engine light is due to a bad O2 sensor, the computer will lean the air-fuel mixture going into the engine. This will cause you to have a lot less power, jerky throttle even with a steady foot, and cause your catalytic converter to heat up since lean mixtures have higher exhaust temperatures. Eventually, this will ruin your catalytic converter and cause your vehicle to fail RTA tests even.

A hot catalytic converter is the leading cause of vehicular fires in the 20th century. With modern cars becoming more electronically complex, the effect of the check engine light is not limited to just the engine. The on-board diagnostics interact with all electronic control modules and sensors on our vehicles to ensure their functioning and your safety. Take care of your car so it can take care of you.

P.S. I have been writing this since few days for an "exceptional post", hope reply also qualifies as admin didn't responded to the guideline of exceptional post request.

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100 Points awarded to @Frederic for "Exceptional Post".

100 Points awarded to @Derick for "Exceptional Post".

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just get it scanned and from there we could guide you where to run...

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Thanks everyone for prompt response, I will check all these stuff and if its still there I will gor computer scanning. Any recomendation for scan shop in Dubai near business bay area?

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If you don’t know how to check the points @Derick mentioned, I would strongly advise you to go directly to any garage.

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