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Chirag S.

Pros & Cons of change in “Tyre's width” (to drive in all terrain)

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Hi,

While changing tyre in friend's Pajero, he chooses to fix 275 width against previous tyre size of 265.

For getting more clarity, your expert guidance seeks on:

1. Whether increase in tyre width really make any difference while driving on sand / wadi / on road / all terrain?

2. Will it make any effect on fuel economy / tyre life / extra noice while driving?

3. Other points

 

Thanks!!!

 

 

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Hi Chirag, 

As I think our our experts will tell you (so aologies for offering an answer as you did request 'expert' advice only!), the secret in the sand is not the width of the trye, but the length of the track when deflated (so it's actually more to do with the height of the tyre than the width).

Being wider will of course give a wider footprint, but that is along a perpendicular line to the vehicle, and what you really want to achieve is more parallel coverage on the sand. 

Issues such as economy/tyre life/noise are driven just as much by the tyre thread pattern and quality of the tyre as the width. What I learned (as I needed two tires recently so have a tiny bit of understanding from that experience) is that the quality of tire is more important than just about anything else. I was tempted to buy some really great looking big tyres for my car  - because they would look great - until one of our real experts brought me back to earth. 

The tires are the only thing in the car between you, the road and crashing. They have a really small footprint when you think about the job that they are supposed to do - which is keep you safely where you need to be on the road while the car tries to rip them apart with it's 00's of horsepower. 

A hgher quality 265 might be quieter, last longer, give better road holding and improved performance than aless expensive but really good looking set of 275s.  

 

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5 minutes ago, Wrangeld said:

Hi Chirag, 

As I think our our experts will tell you (so aologies for offering an answer as you did request 'expert' advice only!), the secret in the sand is not the width of the trye, but the length of the track when deflated (so it's actually more to do with the height of the tyre than the width).

Being wider will of course give a wider footprint, but that is along a perpendicular line to the vehicle, and what you really want to achieve is more parallel coverage on the sand. 

Issues such as economy/tyre life/noise are driven just as much by the tyre thread pattern and quality of the tyre as the width. What I learned (as I needed two tires recently so have a tiny bit of understanding from that experience) is that the quality of tire is more important than just about anything else. I was tempted to buy some really great looking big tyres for my car  - because they would look great - until one of our real experts brought me back to earth. 

The tires are the only thing in the car between you, the road and crashing. They have a really small footprint when you think about the job that they are supposed to do - which is keep you safely where you need to be on the road while the car tries to rip them apart with it's 00's of horsepower. 

A hgher quality 265 might be quieter, last longer, give better road holding and improved performance than aless expensive but really good looking set of 275s.  

 

Since I am jack of all in terms of off roading, for me, each advice is expert advise!! Hence, thanks for your expert advise.

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11 minutes ago, Wrangeld said:

Hi Chirag, 

As I think our our experts will tell you (so aologies for offering an answer as you did request 'expert' advice only!), the secret in the sand is not the width of the trye, but the length of the track when deflated (so it's actually more to do with the height of the tyre than the width).

Being wider will of course give a wider footprint, but that is along a perpendicular line to the vehicle, and what you really want to achieve is more parallel coverage on the sand. 

Issues such as economy/tyre life/noise are driven just as much by the tyre thread pattern and quality of the tyre as the width. What I learned (as I needed two tires recently so have a tiny bit of understanding from that experience) is that the quality of tire is more important than just about anything else. I was tempted to buy some really great looking big tyres for my car  - because they would look great - until one of our real experts brought me back to earth. 

The tires are the only thing in the car between you, the road and crashing. They have a really small footprint when you think about the job that they are supposed to do - which is keep you safely where you need to be on the road while the car tries to rip them apart with it's 00's of horsepower. 

A hgher quality 265 might be quieter, last longer, give better road holding and improved performance than aless expensive but really good looking set of 275s.  

 

Do you think, increase in tyre size width shall influence fuel economy up to certain extent?!

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I'm giving you basics, so you put it together however you need to decode. @Wrangeld is almost right on everything, Ill add few more clarity points.

  • Any increase in tire size: width or height will help in increasing sand flotation to have bigger footprint, however length increase is tad better to give flotation + ground clearance (which is prime requisite in off-road). Width is better when you need to increase the center of gravity by widening your stance. 
  • Tire weight is the prime factor, that many people don't research, understand and factor as not many manufacturer like to share this data. Having bigger size tire, which is lighter than smaller tire is better for off-road long hill climb and better for fuel mileage because you have less weight on per axle to rotate.
  • Tread size and pattern cause major difference in off-road and on-road (comfort and mileage) than tire size or weight alone.

In your friend case 265 -275 is mere 1 cm width, that is TOTALLY NEGLIGIBLE for comfort, mileage, noise, offroad etc. unless you share more data of which tire brand, tread and size he used like 265/65/17.

The more detailed information you share with your precise requirement, the better and productive advice you will get.

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50 minutes ago, Gaurav said:

I'm giving you basics, so you put it together however you need to decode. @Wrangeld is almost right on everything, Ill add few more clarity points.

  • Any increase in tire size: width or height will help in increasing sand flotation to have bigger footprint, however length increase is tad better to give flotation + ground clearance (which is prime requisite in off-road). Width is better when you need to increase the center of gravity by widening your stance. 
  • Tire weight is the prime factor, that many people don't research, understand and factor as not many manufacturer like to share this data. Having bigger size tire, which is lighter than smaller tire is better for off-road long hill climb and better for fuel mileage because you have less weight on per axle to rotate.
  • Tread size and pattern cause major difference in off-road and on-road (comfort and mileage) than tire size or weight alone.

In your friend case 265 -275 is mere 1 cm width, that is TOTALLY NEGLIGIBLE for comfort, mileage, noise, offroad etc. unless you share more data of which tire brand, tread and size he used like 265/65/17.

The more detailed information you share with your precise requirement, the better and productive advice you will get.

Thanks @Gaurav for your valuable feedback. For Pajero, I don't have further details as of now.

But when i compared tyre size for FJ-GXR & FJ-Extreme, GXR comes with 265/70 R17 and extreme comes with 275/70 R17. In this case also, its seems minor difference. Is it a kind of marketing style to justify price /trim or make some difference? 

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Sizes, type of tread and quality of rubber determine price than marketing style.

Once inside that range rest all is marketing jargon to promote that specific set of audience.

For best all terrain tire I always recommend Yokohama Geolander AT, based on my own 8 years of experience with Geolander and 14 years in offroad. BFG, Cooper ATR or STT, Mickey Thompson are awesome tires for off-road: sand and rocks, looks, but very heavy to limit your hill climb unless your ride has power mods. Secondly very noisy on road and drop fuel mileage being heavy to rotate.

Geolander AT are well balanced tires, to give awesome offroad performance and grip with very little road noise and little drop in fuel milage vs HT tires.

Unless you have highly modified desert only toy, don't bother with aggressive treads.

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4 minutes ago, Gaurav said:

Sizes, type of tread and quality of rubber determine price than marketing style.

Once inside that range rest all is marketing jargon to promote that specific set of audience.

For best all terrain tire I always recommend Yokohama Geolander AT, based on my own 8 years of experience with Geolander and 14 years in offroad. BFG, Cooper ATR or STT, Mickey Thompson are awesome tires for off-road: sand and rocks, looks, but very heavy to limit your hill climb unless your ride has power mods. Secondly very noisy on road and drop fuel mileage being heavy to rotate.

Geolander AT are well balanced tires, to give awesome offroad performance and grip with very little road noise and little drop in fuel milage vs HT tires.

Unless you have highly modified desert only toy, don't bother with aggressive treads.

If only it was possible to get hold of Geolander AT/S at the moment 😂

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6 minutes ago, Gaurav said:

Sizes, type of tread and quality of rubber determine price than marketing style.

Once inside that range rest all is marketing jargon to promote that specific set of audience.

For best all terrain tire I always recommend Yokohama Geolander AT, based on my own 8 years of experience with Geolander and 14 years in offroad. BFG, Cooper ATR or STT, Mickey Thompson are awesome tires for off-road and rocks, but very heavy to limit your hill climb unless your ride has power mods. Secondly very noisy on road and drop fuel mileage being heavy to rotate.

Geolander AT are well balanced tires, to give awesome offroad performance and grip with very little road noise and little drop in fuel milage vs HT tires.

Unless you have highly modified desert only toy, don't bother with aggressive treads.

Thanks @Gaurav for giving cost effective explanation. Well noted. 

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