Sidshk

Is Fuel System Cleaner works or Just an Eye wash

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Money spinner for service stations IMO. The fact that it says on the bottle to use it on a mileage as small 4K says it all. They want you to buy loads of it.

Garage I used to work in sold it. I gave a few bottles to friends to try as an experiment and had no positive results that would make me want to pay for and put it in my own car.

The only real way to clean injectors is to remove them and clean them manually. 

As for cleaning valves and pistons, you can try terraclean or snowfoam but using plain tap water will have the same results at zero cost. Look on YouTube, there's a few videos on decarbonising your engine with water. There was a thread on here about it a while ago too. If you want your valves to really look like new, you need walnut blasting. I don't know anyone here who does it. 

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I'm not that impressed to be honest. If everything was shiny clean and silver I might be.

Another thing to consider, if it really is capable of cleaning deposits off like that (which I don't believe it is), what do you think is happening inside your engine? If it was really that powerful, it would strip all the lubricant off the cylinders and you would either end up with massive blow by or a siezed engine in no time. 

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i think its effect is inside the combustion part of the cylinder { upper part) and the lubricant oil shall be on the cylinder wall under the compression rings so the lubrication oil still doing its job while using fuel system treatments.

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It is actually useful and also snake oil to be very honest.

It is useful in really really really bad super bad engine condition, stalled in scrap for long time and when installed make lot of spluttering and clanking on first run. I used these products two bottle in half tank - 4 times the dosage and felt some noticeable difference. That's it.

I also used these prodcuts in my other car second, third and fourth time and never felt a thing. So it cleans is true, but use every certain kms is a bullshit to make profit thats why every petrol station has to force this suggestive sell. You can't simply clean further whatever is already cleaned.

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On 25/09/2017 at 5:09 PM, ma7amad said:

i think its effect is inside the combustion part of the cylinder { upper part) and the lubricant oil shall be on the cylinder wall under the compression rings so the lubrication oil still doing its job while using fuel system treatments.

Wrong.

If you look inside the cylinder, you will see scores on the wall. These are known as cross hatchings and put there deliberately by the manufacturer or engine builder during the honing process. The purpose of these is to retain a small amount of engine oil above the piston to lubricate the primary and secondary rings. 

If you don't have this small amount of oil on the cylinder walls, the piston rings can wear out or jam, which is something you see a lot of here through people with no proper training building engines. They stick new pistons and rings in without giving any attention to the cylinder wall. I have seen rebuilt engines fail after a couple of thousand kms and upon strip down, the walls were polished like mirrors.

Bore wash is basically what the name says. The bore is washed of its lubricant. This can happen a few ways. I.e. If an injector becomes stuck open through mechanical or electrical fault, the mixture being too rich, or the use of fuel system cleaners. An unlubricated cylinder is bad news.

IMG_0337.JPG

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may be this picture for engine block without liner fitted inside the cylinder the compression ring from its name can't pass any fluids/gases otherwise the compression shall be reduced and combustion gases with its high pressure crossing the ring pressurize the oil system with gases and we can expect the scenario,

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Wrong again. 

Not every engine uses cylinder liners. In fact, the majority don't. 

See below the picture of a liner, again you can clearly see  the cross hatchings inside. 

There are 2 compression rings on a piston, the primary and the secondary. They do not hold in 100% of compression efficiently as anyone who has ever done a compression test will tell you. This is why there are 2 compression rings. Because they are not efficient. 

What happens if you slide 2 pieces of metal together 5000 times a minute without lubricant? They will become extremely hot, wear down or more likely friction weld themselves together. So using basic logic, of course the cylinder wall inside the combustion chamber needs to be lubricated. 

Are you really an engineer? Because this is very basic fundamental stuff.

IMG_1794.JPG

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The cross-hatch pattern actually does two things-

As Barry correctly points out, the score marks hold a small quantity of oil to lubricate the rings, but this same quantity of oil also serves as an additional seal to help contain the combustion pressure. However, the angle at which the hatching occurs on the cylinder wall is very important- too small and the oil is scraped off by the rings, and too big, the combustion pressure pushes the oil reserve out past the rings.

Also important is the depth of the hatching, and by the looks of it, the hatching in the picture of the cylinder that @Barry posted is a little on the deep side, unless it just looks that way because of the lighting angle. 

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