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Electric Range Rover | Fully Charged

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1 minute ago, treks said:

I would not put too much store by these so-called "predictions". 

Given the fact that the electricity generating capacity of most western countries is already under severe pressure, and that it takes about seven years (on average) and about a billion dollars to build a single power station, it seems extremely unlikely that any of these predictions will become reality.  

I totally agree and even if it does remotely then we are talking about 125 million vs 2 Billion = 1 (EV) :16 (IC) ratio by 2035-40

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Ok, guys, I think this discussion has gone from understanding the sustainability factor to an argument over which is better IC or EV. 

That was never my point. The point was about people should generally know the environmental benefits of opting for an EV over a IC car (if they can afford one i.e.) 

There are challenges and limitations obviously in going full-on EV. But at the moment if we start small scale like adopting public transport systems using alternative fuels and sources of energy it'll be really helpful for everyone and have a positive impact on the environment. 

18 hours ago, Gaurav said:

I totally agree and even if it does remotely then we are talking about 125 million vs 2 Billion = 1 (EV) :16 (IC) ratio by 2035-40

Electric cars being sold today can draw two to five times more power when they’re charging than electric cars that came on the market just a couple of years ago. But the impact of charging one depends on where it is on the grid and how it is charged. They don’t pose a problem if they’re charged slowly at conventional 110 volt outlets. And public fast-charging stations don’t impact the grid much because they are part of commercial grids that have transformers and other equipment sized to accommodate large loads.

Both PG&E and Southern California Edison are also working to avoid grid problems by offering special rate plans for EV owners. These give customers discounts for charging at night, during off-peak hours.

Electric cars can typically be programmed to charge at certain times, rather than just charging as soon as they’re plugged in. If car owners set their cars to be completely charged by a certain time, say 6 a.m., this has the effect of staggering when cars start charging. The start time depends on how depleted the battery is—to finish at 6 a.m. might require starting at 2 a.m. or 4 a.m., depending on how much charging is needed. So instead of a surge of power demand when people get home from work, the charging is spread out through the night.
It’s technically possible for utilities to communicate with cars to have them start charging when there’s excess power being produced, and stop when there’s a peak in demand. That way, utilities could use electric cars to help stabilize the grid, and avoid the need to use inefficient “peaker” power plants. Utilities could pay electric car owners to let them do this.

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It was never about which is better- it was always about whether it's possible to produce millions of electric vehicles. It's possible, but not feasible.  

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1 minute ago, treks said:

It was never about which is better- it was always about whether it's possible to produce millions of electric vehicles. It's possible, but not feasible.  

I agree totally. First, it's not feasible and second it's not yet matured to replace the IC - referring what desertdude said low hanging fruit with big drama and noise to push down people's throat and tree huggers.

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All this EV talk at the moment is pie in the sky and people being forced to eat a half baked cake just because supposedly its the "right thing" to do and something for the hippies to feel good about themselves and scoff at regular car users.

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