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Frederic
Frederic

How To Deflate Your Tyres

When starting as an off-roading enthusiast in UAE, you will come to hear about deflating your tyres, and setting your tyres to the right tyre pressure is one of the first things you will need to learn to master. The main reason for deflating your tyres is to obtain a longer footprint in the sand, and that enables you to drive on the sand, instead of digging into it. 

Tyre pressure is defined in PSI (pounds per square inch) or Bar. You will find both readings on your pressure gauge. In UAE most people use PSI, and the gas station compressors also use the PSI identification.

Below you can see the corresponding PSI and Bar readings.

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As a beginner level offroader, you should reduce your tyre pressure to about 15 PSI. This is low enough to enable you to drive in the dunes without the risk of the tyre coming off the rim. This 15PSI is also perfect for on-road-tyres.

After a few drives, and depending on the terrain, or if you have offroad tyres, you can slowly deflate further down to 10-12 PSI. Take note that the risk for having a pop-out will increase, so don't be afraid to post your questions on the Carnity website or consult one of the marshals if you are not sure about your tyre pressure.

There are different ways of deflating your tyres, and each have their advantages and disadvantages. The more you will practice, the sooner you will find out what works best for you.

How does a stem valve looks like ?

The stem valve is consisting out of 3 pieces. The body, that is made of flexible rubber, the core, and the valve cap. Take note of the following:

- The rubber valve body wears out over time. Once you start to see cracks, it is advisable to get it replaced at the nearest tyre center.

- The valve core is a tiny component with a small rubber gasket. If you remove them on a weekly basis, the gasket slowly wears out or the core can even break. Carry 5-10 spares in your vehicle. The tyre center often give them for free.

- The valve cap keeps dirt and sand from entering into the valve, so it's advisable to always screw the cap back on. 

 

Valve Stems

 

The process of deflating / inflating goes by either pushing in the valve core, which allows air to be released, or by removing the valve core, which is a much faster option. 

How to check the tyre pressure ?

Verifying your tyre pressure is really easy. Get yourself a pressure gauge, and push it against the tyre valve, or screw it on (depending on the model). You will see the reading in PSI or Bar.

The digital ones are fine, but one day the battery will be empty, so a good old analogue is preferred to have as well. 

PS if you find that your gauge has difficulties reading the tyre pressure, and you really need to push it hard onto the valve, this is an indication that the valve core is worn out. Replace it with a new one and you will see that this will solve your problem.

Digital Car Tyre Air Pressure Gauge Meter Manometer Tester Tool Car Tire Tool for Auto Car Motorcycleimage.png.b9eaff03f76e409d26f11bd367fd925f.png

 

Which tools to deflate and how much time will it take ?

1) Set of keys, a rock, or anything you might find in your car  (+/- 15 mins)

1610869852_deflationkeys.jpg.b3ecbebd16028cc0317a32186a9591e8.jpg

PROS: CHEAP and plenty of stuff available

CONS: Takes a very long time which you could use for a smoke or a chat and risk on damaging the valve stems. 

 

2) Valve Chucks (4-5 minutes)

Buy 4 of them and stick them on all tyres simultaneously and then wait about a few minutes (as per your type and size of tyre) to arrive at around 17-18 psi. Then take one tyre at a time and use your pressure gauge to further decrease and finetune the pressure of each individual tyre. 

PROS: Fast and Cheap

CONS: none that i know off.

964823273_airchuckclips.jpg.29d7892877d6cf6f679999095e93aa1d.jpg

3) Stem removal tool (2-3 minutes)

Available in most hardware shops. Enables you to remove the valve core stem so the tyre pressure comes down very fast. 

PROS: Very Fast and Cheap

CONS: Be careful not to lose the stem as it can blow out. So taking some spare is advisable. Be careful not to deflate too much as it really goes fast. Use a stopwatch and learn to find the perfect timing when to screw it back in, and then double check with a pressure gauge.

Amazon.com: GUAngqi Tyre Valve Removal Tool, 2 in 1 Tire Valve ...

4) Rapid Tyre deflator and pressure gauge ( 4-5 mins)

This tool enables you to loosen the stem, quickly deflate and immediately take a pressure reading. 

PROS: Professional tool for reasonable price, pressure gauge and deflator in one tool.

CONS: Might take a bit of practice to get the hang of it. The fake chinese ones are fairly unreliable.

1062179319_deflatesuperior.jpg.8284d355c2b69e10c8bf1c49e98a0953.jpg

 

As with all tools and gear, we advise you to practice a bit at home to become familiar with them. It is also recommended to carry two pressure gauges, so you can compare them with each-other and double check your readings. Often we have seen pressure gauges giving accurate readings at high pressures (35) but very inaccurate results at 10-15 PSI.

Edited by Frederic



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Thanks @Frederic for another very helpful information.  Now i came to know why my tire got flat last friday.   The core has worn out since i”ve been removing it during every deflation. 😐

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1 hour ago, Jun Zamora said:

Thanks @Frederic for another very helpful information.  Now i came to know why my tire got flat last friday.   The core has worn out since i”ve been removing it during every deflation. 😐

No it has nothing to do with age, I have been doing it since forever. While screwing the core back, you must have left it little loose or sand must have stuck in between for slowly losing the tire pressure.

This happens with everyone once in a while, and that's why we constantly keep checking tires visually while offroading.

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Thanks @Frederic for this valuable information about the first step we do as soon as we reach at our meeting points. 
 

I use the 3rd option, stem removal tool but I don’t remove the core out, what I do is just release the air by removing the core but holding on to the removal tool without taking the core out. While practicing the tool first time near my home, the core just flew away and I had to change it from tyre shop, thanks to my confidence level I was trying this at a gas station which had a tyre shop 😀. After this I am always scared to completely remove the core and got used to counting logic till it reaches around 13-15.
 

Thank you for the insights, I will buy some spare core valves and will try removing the core completely during next drive. 

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Hey There,

Can somebody suggest what tyre pressure shud i be on for my nissan patrol Y62. I have 265/70R18 Dunlop Grandtrek tyres. I had the 275/60R20 before and with 15PSI i had no issues. I recently changed to the 18rims with 15psi, i was facing trouble while climbing up the dunes with lot of refusals. Can someone suggest the pressure i can go upto or do i need to change the tyres. Suggestions please.

@Lorenzo Candelpergher @Rahimdad

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1 hour ago, Yusuf Esaf said:

Hey There,

Can somebody suggest what tyre pressure shud i be on for my nissan patrol Y62. I have 265/70R18 Dunlop Grandtrek tyres. I had the 275/60R20 before and with 15PSI i had no issues. I recently changed to the 18rims with 15psi, i was facing trouble while climbing up the dunes with lot of refusals. Can someone suggest the pressure i can go upto or do i need to change the tyres. Suggestions please.

@Lorenzo Candelpergher @Rahimdad

Dear @Yusuf Esaf, I have Kumho 275/70R18 AT51, so something fairly similar to yours. I initially deflated to 13psi, then, progressively I was able to go deflate more an more. I found that 12psi is usually ok, but depending on sand conditions I may deflate even further down to 10.5psi, below which I see no further benefits in normal off-road driving.

I would suggest you try 13 or 12 and see if you notice a difference, it should be more than sufficient. As you approach intermediate level, then you may want to explore a bit more deflating in difficult terrains, but remember that even high profile tires can pop-out, especially with heavyweight beasts like the Y62, so more deflation can only go along with more experience.

Edited by Lorenzo Candelpergher
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45 minutes ago, Gaurav said:

@Yusuf Esaf if you are on HT (Highway Tread) tires, don't go below 13-14 PSI, to avoid pop-outs.

If you are on AT tires then you can lower to 12 PSI as @Lorenzo Candelpergher mentioned.

Good point @Gaurav: these levels of deflating should be achieved only with AT tires, whose side structure is designed to withstand running at low PSI. If I'm not mistaken Grandtrek tires are AT graded, thus they should behave quite similarly to my Kumho. 

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Just now, Hossam Anwar said:

Thanks @Frederic for this all information, I have question if had pop out

should I go tyre shop to check it or to clean the sand inside? 

Yes please and also balance that tire again.

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