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feel free to join if you dont mind to get your hands dirty greasy we can share our ideas but not our tools

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  2. Barry

    some very important gauges

    XR6 is a cool car. We didn’t get it or the XR8. We never got the P100 Cortina either but we got the P100 Sierra. If some of those cars were shipped to UK/Ireland they would sell for good money.
  3. treks

    some very important gauges

    I had one such oil pressure gauges' plumbing fail on a Cortina XR6 once. It was not pretty- had to replace half of the carpet and both front seats. Avoid these gauges if at all possible.
  4. desertdude

    some very important gauges

    I know there are such gauges and they are precise I have a couple to test fuel rail pressure but didnt know in dash mech gauges existed. Who needs the added headache of plumbing going all the way feom the dash to motor
  5. Gaurav

    some very important gauges

    And also as per my recent research electrical are better than OBD ones, as they only catch the fluctuation what OBD tells them and in case if OBD doesn't record exhaust or oil pressure then they won't deliver that.
  6. shadow79

    some very important gauges

    the mechanical ones are really precise and up to the dot it will also record the minor fluctuations too and it requires a calibration ones in awhile..the electronic one will flatten the minor fluctuations and the sensor will have a minimum and maximum point below that and above that it wont show...
  7. Barry

    some very important gauges

    They’re popular for hydraulic systems because they’re simple and cheap to manufacture. They’re also good for testing purposes because you can simply screw it into a port to check pressures, no messing with wires. The pressure goes inside the copper bit which is known as a bourdon tube. This makes it uncoil a bit which in turn moves the needle.
  8. desertdude

    some very important gauges

    Really? Didnt even know indash non mechanical gauges existed, who would want that, just another point of failure for you coolant or oil to leak
  9. Barry

    some very important gauges

    Also to add, always go for electrical gauges with sender units. Some gauges like oil pressure, turbo pressure have a pipe running directly to the gauge. If that pipe breaks it will cover the back of your dashboard in oil.
  10. Barry

    some very important gauges

    Tim gauges are good quality and reasonably priced. Plenty of people using them in high end builds. You can mix and match whatever gauges you want, water, oil, battery etc. The market is full of universal 52mm mounts and pods for cheap so you can mount them on the dash, in the dash, on the a pillar or anywhere else you want.
  11. Gaurav

    some very important gauges

    Ok guys, I know the pro guys run Motec and other stuff that a normal weekend warrior really cannot afford to spend upto 5-10k USD just for gauges unless you are doing these stuff for a living. So my question is what is the best and reasonably priced gauge that every weekend warrior can afford to keep a close eye on engine oil temp and pressure, water temp and exhaust temp to know when to stop pushing if things go south - once in a while.
  12. treks

    some very important gauges

    I disagree. It is not a cheap copy; it is a cheap and nasty copy...
  13. Barry

    some very important gauges

    That’s a cheap Chinese copy of a Stack motorsport dash. The original ones cost up to $2,000 or more. They’re extremely popular and most rally cars I’ve worked on run Stack systems. http://www.stackltd.com/
  14. desertdude

    some very important gauges

    I had a friend who had replaced stock gauges with this or something very similar to this as it looked exactly like this on his modified Jeep TJ. Looked real ugly TBH
  15. Gaurav

    some very important gauges

    Just a food for thought, how about going for "almost" all in one cluster for key data like Exhaust temp, Water Temp, Oil Temp, Oil Pressure etc in one single digital panel. It is supplied with individual sensor and wiring and all those get connected to control panel that is hooked with digital panel, looks pretty neat but pricey. Anyone tried this one.....? How about this one: https://www.ebay.com/itm/132641287237
  16. Grounds for castration right there. You’ll be doing the world a favour from stopping him reproducing. I had one particularly bad apprentice a few years ago, his name was Elmer. Let’s just say he wasn’t the brightest spark that came from the grinder. I tried my best to show him everything and be patient but he would be better suited to spending his days to riding a yellow bus to a special school, licking the windows as he goes. He lasted a month before I had to ask him to leave. I lent him my motorbike to go to the shop and it came back with the front forks bent and that was the last straw. From what I hear he’s still drifting from job to job every few months breaking expensive machinery everywhere he goes.
  17. I had employed a helper who's only work was to clean the shop and gather the tools after work and obviously he couldn't do either he always use to loose tools I even told him that I will buy it from his salary but still no use..he still would find something bigger in size to loose
  18. That might be the case from where you reside but here my friend you are at the mercy of workers...if they use the screwdriver as levers then you are bound to provide them with a screwdriver and a lever or else they gonna find something else to break....
  19. Using your own tools is the norm here, too, except for as you say, the heavy stuff. However, if the employer supplies the tools, that employer is sure that every mechanic has all the tools needed to do any job. I've seen cases where "mechanics" pitch up for work with a rusty box containing a few screwdrivers, a pair of pliers, and maybe a few sockets, and nothing else but a lot of hope that someone will lend him what he needs to get through a job. Needless to say, I never employed such dung-rollers.
  20. i had that rachet it was more then 25 years old my dad gave it to me we also used to put pipe on it and open tough bolts dad used to come by every other week to open it up and grease the balls and springs in it until it also passed on to some other dimension P.S dad was really pissed for that one... later on i got 2 ratchets one for my car and one for the shop and i also got the proper rod handle for using it with pipes
  21. When I was working back home every mechanic had to supply his own tools. The company only paid for big stuff like air tools over 1/2", double barrel torque wrenches etc. I liked it like that, taught me a lot of respect for my tools and I had enough of a collection to do my own work in the garage at home. No excuse for not having a tool either. 2 tool vans came twice a week and had a credit scheme but some of the guys went crazy on it and were paying off £5,000 + Snap On roll cabs for years. I ended up leaving most of my stuff to a friend when I left. He had been very good to me and helped me with a lot of personal stuff and it was the least I could do to try to pay him back. My first mechanic job here was in a workshop in Sharjah. Got off the plane in Abu Dhabi and headed to the workshop. Arrived around midnight and had a sleep to start at 8 AM the next day. Bear in mind I had no clue about Sharjah, I was as green as grass and I thought it was like Dubai. I got a shock when I rolled into the shop in the morning. The biggest bunch of rag tag hammer wielders I had ever seen in my life. One beaten up old roll cab with the drawers falling off shared between 8-9 guys. One ratchet being shared between everyone in the shop so I spent most of my time standing around drinking karak and scratching my arse. The owner was so mean he wouldn't even buy a breaker bar for loosening nuts. Yet he had to replace our one and only ratchet every few days when someone put a pipe on in and broke the mechanism. I never understood that mentality. I lasted 6 weeks before I noped right out of there.
  22. There is nothing I hate more than clutter. Apart from creating a bad impression on walk-in clients, continually having to look for stuff used to cost me money. Instead of actually working, my mechanics would stumble around looking for something, so I stopped them using their own tools and equipment about two years after I bought my shop. To make things easier on all of us, I supplied them all with everything they needed (cost a fortune and nearly bankrupted me, but that's another story), and made them pay for anything that "magically got transported to other dimensions". I replaced everything that broke or wore out during normal use. I also gave each mechanic his own workbench and lockable cabinets, and fined them ten bucks if I found anything on the floor in their work stations. At first they hated the idea of working under those conditions, but once they got used to it, they refused to leave- in fact, during the last twelve years I had the shop, I had the same staff.
  23. many many that i have really lost count of it...lately i just buy 10 to 15 bulb holders and keep them in a box and have wiring looms handy whenever i need to extend those wires organised is a loving word i really love it but cant seem to get in to it...i have 4 boxes and some tools which i treasure i keep them separate in the metal cupboard i have lost my 10mm 12mm and 14mms quite a few times lately i just ask for the tools from my associate and later on after finishing the work he just asks them back and places them in their place i sure know its a dent in the pocket to buy the same tools again as i am the one who ends up buying it... specially those bits and small sockets with falls in the engine bay then is magically transported to some other dimension i have stopped almost all the shops except from one who borrows from me and i also get tools from them others have a habit of losing them i don't know why i remember you coming to my shop once at that time i was alone so just used to throw everything in and close the shutter and make a run for home so the shop was almost up to the brim full of old stuffs and i used to work out of the shop now that the associate has come in the shop he wanted some changes in the shop and he cleared almost everything here now i can park a car in the shop and work on it after a long time again... no i don't have walk in customers as my shop is located away from the main road the customers in this part of the town are 99.99% only those who are sent by someone who specifically gives them my shop address...
  24. You need to get better organised. Couple of roll cabs with cut out foam inserts. A place for everything and everything in its place. Clean and put all the tools away when your finished a job and and a quick check before you go home to see if anything is missing. Makes jobs faster too as you can reach into the box and get anything when you need it because it’s where it’s supposed to be. Customers like to see a nice clean garage with things organised, it gives the impression that the mechanic is organised. I rarely lose any tools. Mostly because I know how much it costs to replace stuff. The biggest problem is people borrowing stuff and not bringing it back but there are very few people I will lend to now and when I do I stay on top of it and send gentle reminders if not returned. If I don’t know or don’t like a person I’ll just say sorry I don’t have that tool or I’m using it.
  25. I'm intrigued- how many of these bulb holders have you lost over the years? Do you just reach for another whenever you lose one?
  26. saw that thing when was buying the normal tester they were asking for 140 and i was like anyway its gonna get lost so no thank you now that you have mentioned it.. you are right i always have to shout to someone at the battery who will be changing the polarity so i can peacefully do my work of checking the circuit right... having been playing around with such testers i have almost got the idea behind it if the light is beaming bright then its having good volts there and in case of checking for leaks i first test the circuit with the brake bulb then again test it with the small park lights then in the end to make sure its fully cured i test it with the dashboard light that way i make really sure that there is no further current leaks running in the cars...i know its a long process but still i get it the problem with a iron feist so it wont pop up again unless some other appliance starts to act drunk....
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